August 24, 2016

Living in Australia, Part 1

It’s hard to believe, but it’s been almost three months since we moved to Australia - and our furniture should be here “any day now.”  Cindy and I were lucky to find a townhouse by the ocean where the owner was willing to let us move in with it furnished, and then they will take away the furniture when ours arrives.  It turns out that most of the appartments we looked at were on the market furnished, and no one wanted to remove their furniture, so we are fortunate to have found this place.  But it means I do about a 45 minute commute each way.  Don’t feel sorry for me . .
 
For me it is a dream location because almost every room has a view of the ocean so I feel like I’m on a boat, except without the expense and maintenance of actually owning a boat.  I just hit 600 days straight of running, and most days I get to run on the beach.  I’m putting in a lot of hours at the University so on the days when I’m running before the sun comes up, or late at night, I run on the esplanade.  It’s still winter here, but the days are getting longer and Spring starts September 1.  It seems very safe here, so I just put on a headlamp and go.  
 
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Going to work is an adventure too - I walk up a nature trail, often in the dark, through a neighbourhood, up to the train station.  My sister taught me when I was a kid that I didn’t need a flashlight most of the time if there is just a little bit of moonlight, so I think of her when I walk the trail in the dark.  I’ll admit it was a little scary the first few times, but I enjoy it now.  Walking down from the train with the sun setting into the ocean makes it all worth it.
 
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The reason I’m running and walking so much is we’ve decided to try to do without owning a car here.  That seemed really easy the first month when we were staying in the Central Business District (Thanks again Jana!).  Adelaide’s CBD is beautiful, clean and safe and it was nice to just be able to take the elevator down, walk a few hundred meters and be at the grocery or a restaurant.  
 
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We gave that up when we moved to the ocean, so now we own grocery trollies and we walk or take public transportation everywhere we go, except for the occasional weekend where we rent a car for a few days to either see the sights or do a big shopping run.  Most weekends we drag our trollies up the hill, get on the train and go to the grocery store four or five stops down the line.  It’s fun really, and I’m not missing having a car.  Adelaide has declared that it will be the first carbon neutral city in the world, and I feel like I’m helping a bit and staying healthier in the process, and it is so much less stressful to just hop on the train or tram.
 
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I expected that there would be some challenges in moving around the world.  In fact I’ve learned that figuring out all the little differences in culture and society is a big part of the fun.  Some of the challenges are amusing - learning that french fries are chips, and ketchup is tomato sauce here for instance.  I still don’t know what to ask for if I actually want tomato sauce to use in our spaghetti sauce recipe.  
 
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Here they say “How are you going?” rather than “How are you doing?”  I'm quick to tell people that I am the one with the accent.
 
Other things are not so amusing, like having to work with companies in the US who simply do not have a way to deal with people who’ve moved to another country.  Here in Australia phone numbers look different, and zip codes are four digits, not five.  More than one place where I had an account couldn’t deal with that, but luckily a very good friend is allowing me to have what little paper mail I get to be sent to his address in Colorado, and I can use that address when they won’t accept an Australian address.
 
Just today I found out that the US Post Office sent change of address notices to everyone, including the Department of Motor Vehicles, who now has sent me a letter saying I could be fined if I don’t update my vehicle registration to match my new address.  The problem is, they won’t let me do it online, or even by mail - they expect me to actually go in person to the DMV in Longmont to make the change.  For a car that is in storage and not being driven.  
 
Adelaide is a great multicultural city.  Every day I hear languages that I don’t understand and can’t even identify.  And it turns out that Americans are not that common here.  In Sydney yes, but not Adelaide, so I’m often asked if I’m Canadian.  I think they are playing it safe - if you ask a Canadian if they are American, they might be insulted.  (That’s a joke, sort of)  In any case, often total strangers will ask me where I’m from and what brought me here.  And if they talk to me more than a few minutes, and they often do because everyone here is so friendly, they will usually ask me “what’s up with Trump?”  I won’t get into to politics too much here, but the rest of the world seems to be making contingency plans in case he gets elected and they wonder how it is he got this far.  They just don't understand it, and they are worried.  I actually saw “Trump” listed as a risk in a PowerPoint presentation for a startup that is bringing a product to market in the US.  I’ll save the rest of my thoughts for private conversations.  And yes, I am registered to vote in November, which was another little challenge.  It’s not like they make it super easy for US Citizens to vote when they happen to be out of the country during an election.
 
The point is that all of these little challenges, that happen almost daily, do add up to a bit of fatigue at times.  I had not expected it, and I was feeling like I was always behind in the tasks I had to get done.  I certainly wasn’t regretting making the move, but I was getting a bit tired.  (Australian’s love to say “a bit” as in, “A crocodile took off my leg, and now I have a bit of trouble walking very far.”)  Lucky for me the Uni assigned me a buddy to look after me and help me get settled into the job.  I believe she had been in the Peace Corp, so she saw the signs and told me that it was normal for people who make big moves to go through a cycle of ups and downs.  Euphoria when you arrive, then a down bit when you start missing family and friends and “normal” life, and then you come back up again when you start to get settled.  Just knowing that it was normal helped get me back on track, and I’ll always appreciate that she told me about the phenomena.  That was a turning point for me.  (Thanks Alicia!)
 
Before I stop whinging, I’ll say that staying in touch with family and friends has been more difficult than I expected, but I’m working on getting better at it.  Given that I am 19 AND A HALF hours in the future, that means there is only a window in the morning, or after midnight, when I can call people.  I never was very good at making phone calls, and now I’m worse.  I’ve actually considered posting to Facebook just to make sure people know I’m alive, and I’m doing this blog post because several good friends cared enough to poke me.  Thank you.  I do not intend to disappear here.
 
Here’s part of the problem - most days are fabulous.  I mean living the dream, amazing, can’t believe I’m here, happy days.  I think to myself, “Oh, I should post on Facebook that a dolphin just swam by” or “A flock of parrots just flew over.”  But then I think, “I don’t want to be that guy who only posts “Look at me!” posts."  So, to avoid that, I have to commit to posting frequently and to writing about the normal, trivial and even annoying stuff, and that’s not my nature either.  So I haven’t figured it out, and that means it may be another three months before I do an update.  But I am thinking of all my family and friends.  I wish you could be here, I wish we could talk and have a coffee or a beer, and I wish you all the happiness that I am experiencing right now.  I’d love to hear from you too, and though it may take me a bit to answer, I am thinking of you.  If you are up for a 24 hour plane ride, we have a spare bedroom.
 
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To my new friends in Australia - I love it here, and I appreciate you inviting me into the country!  Sometimes I think you don't realise what a great place this is, and that's the only negative thing I can say. Oh, and the slow Internet, but that's another post.  :-)
 
 

August 24, 2016 in Australia | Permalink | Comments

August 20, 2016

Waiting for the train

My good friend Marty emailed to say it is time to update my blog. Life in Australia is great, but very busy. I'm taking a minute while waiting for the train to explore mobile access to Typepad, where my blog is hosted.

If this works, I'll be better about doing updates. Unfortunately it doesn't seem to allow photos to be uploaded. Maybe it is time to think about a new provider.

August 20, 2016 in Australia | Permalink | Comments (0)

June 15, 2016

My new job in Australia - From Longmont to Adelaide in less than three months

The story of how I ended up in Australia begins almost 20 years ago.  I was given a copy of a manuscript for a new book to be published called Leading at the Speed of Growth.  One of the authors was Dr. Jana Matthews and I knew she was a friend of Brad Feld’s and had been a leader at the Kauffman Foundation.
 
I read Leading at the Speed of Growth at a time when I was struggling as an entrepreneur.  We had grown the company, hired a lot of employees, moved into new space and I was not having fun.  Reading Jana’s book made me realise that I needed to change and grow as much as my company was changing and growing.  I decided I had to go from being the hands-on startup techie guy who liked to code, to an actual leader of a company.  Fortunately Jana lived in Boulder, and I was able to meet her and spend time talking about the concepts she had developed over the years working with high-growth companies.
 
We both still remember having breakfast together the day after the September 11th attacks.  Like everyone else we were still in shock but I felt better after that breakfast because Jana inspired me to focus on being a good leader and to be there for my employees.  After that, we got together regularly to talk about growing companies.  Often we talked about culture, core values and the challenges of growing as a CEO.  My assistant at the time sometimes suggested I get together with Jana whenever she noticed the stress of the job weighing on my shoulders - it was that obvious that Jana was helping me cope and learn.
 
Jana is often introduced as a “Global Thought Leader” and she earned that title by literally going all over the world to work with CEOs and their teams.  She traveled to Australia to work with growth companies, and soon helped found an accelerator for startups with growth potential.  I had been a mentor at the Boulder Technology Incubator and at Techstars, so Jana called me up and invited me to visit Adelaide and be a mentor to their first cohort of entrepreneurs.
 
I fell in love with Adelaide, and as Jana likes to quote, I said, “How can you miss a place you didn’t even know existed until a few week ago?”  I was fortunate to be invited back for the third cohort, and enjoyed working with Jana and being in Adelaide even more.  When I heard that Jana had become the Director of the Centre for Business Growth at the University of South Australia, I wondered if I might be so lucky as to get a third visit back to Adelaide to work with her again.
 
In October of 2014, Jana invited me to come down and be a “Visiting Growth Entrepreneur” but I was in the midst of getting Launch Longmont started and I reluctantly declined.  On March 5th, 2016 I emailed Jana to say that I was done with Launch Longmont and that Cindy and I were thinking about a trip to New Zealand.  Instead of getting vacation tips back, Jana called me a few hours later to ask me to consider coming to Australia for a year (at least!) to be the “Growth Entrepreneur in Residence” at the Centre.  I've now joined Jana, a growing group of researchers and managers, and other CEOs/mentors to help grow companies in South Australia and beyond.
 
In less than three months we went from thinking about “what’s next” to living in Adelaide, Australia.  I am so grateful to Jana for making all of this possible and I’m honoured to be working with her and the team.  When I first read Leading at the Speed of Growth, I never imagined how far it might take me!
 
 
 

June 15, 2016 in Australia, Entrepreneurship | Permalink | Comments

April 29, 2016

It's Official, I'm off to Australia!

My Work Visa was approved this week, so it's official - I'm moving to Adelaide Australia!  We've given notice on the rental house that we've been in this past year in Longmont since we sold our house in Boulder, and now it's just a matter of packing up stuff into storage and getting on the plane on May 25th.  That gives me less than a month to do a lot of organizing, donating and saying goodbye to many friends and family.  

At times it is a little overwhelming to think about, but mostly it is just exciting to consider how lucky I am.  I'm going to get paid to hang out with entrepreneurs who are growing interesting companies in a country that every single person I know has said they wished they could visit.  Adelaide, the city where I'll be living, isn't as well known as larger cities like Sydney but it is listed in the top ten most livable cities in the world and I can't wait to start exploring!

I'll do updates to this blog in the future about what it's like to make a move half way around the world, and about the great people and companies that I know I will encounter in the process.  If you want to get email updates, you can sign up to be notified whenever I do a new post or just check back occasionally.

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Hawkes Building, photo courtesy UniSA.

For more on my move check out this post: http://www.terrygold.com/t/2016/03/life-after-part-2-big-news.html

 

April 29, 2016 in Australia, Entrepreneurship | Permalink | Comments

March 24, 2016

Meeting of the Minds Event, Boulder 4/4

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I have been the Entrepreneur in Residence at the Temple Grandin School, and it's been a great experience working with the students and helping the staff think about the school as a startup.  They are a great organization doing important work with kids who are on the Autism spectrum.  The kids and young adults at TGS are all bright and interesting people, and many will go on to be engineers, entrepreneurs and artists.

On April 4th, 2016 the school is sponsoring an event with Temple Grandin herself, Phil McKinney who Vanity Fair named the “The Innovation Guru".  New York Times best selling author David Finch's will be there and his quick wit and keen insights on living with Asperger's Syndrome have captivated audiences across the nation. 

We have invited all three of these fascinating people to help us mark the Five Year Anniversary of Temple Grandin School the evening of Monday, April 4th, 2016.  

Please join us for a moderated conversation and reception at the beautiful eTown Hall in Boulder.  The topic of the evening will be neurodiversity - different kinds of minds.  Frasca Food and Wine will be serving delicious small bites complemented by delightful wines and local craft brews.  There will be an opportunity for VIP ticket holders to attend a private reception with the speakers before the talk.

Help us celebrate Autism Awareness Month and the Five Year Anniversary of TGS by attending the  "Meeting of the Minds" on 4/4/16!

Detailed Event Info:

http://templegrandinschool.org/?event=meeting-of-the-minds

Buy Tickets:

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/meeting-of-the-minds-cultivating-a-neurodiverse-workplace-tickets-21048391305

 

 

March 24, 2016 in Blogging | Permalink | Comments

March 22, 2016

Life After, Part 2 - Big News!

A lot has happened since my last blog post, which was just over a year ago.  We closed the doors to Launch Longmont on February 29th this year.  The coworking space was a success in that we brought in some great members and had a positive impact on the community, but construction that was supposed to be started and done in three or four months never got past the demolition point.  Because of the delay we decided to shut it down.
 
And now for Part 2 . . .
 
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(Jeffrey Smart Building, University of South Australia - photo courtesy UniSA)
 
So you know how everyone tells you “when one door closes, another one opens?”  I am living proof.  Last week I received an offer to spend a year as the Growth Entrepreneur-in-Residence at the University of South Australia, in Adelaide.  UniSA is in the top 3% of QS World University Rankings, and the UniSA Business School ranks in the top 1% globally.  Wow!  There are over 36,000 students and yet the University was just founded 25 years ago.
 
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After a quick trip over to observe and look for a place to live, Cindy and I will be moving there sometime at the end of May, and I’ll be starting in my new position June 1st.
 
I will miss Longmont, and I will have to resign as President of Startup Longmont.  I’m very proud of all the people who have made this organization what it is.  When I arrived in town about a year and a half ago, the Startup Longmont Meetup had just over 30 members.  Yesterday we added our 800th member, and earlier in the month we became a real 501(c)(3) non-profit.  It has been my pleasure to work with all the people of Longmont, and though I will be half a world away soon, I will always be a Startup Longmont member!
 
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I also won’t be the “Resident Entrepreneur” at the Temple Grandin School for at least the next year, but perhaps my new title can be Entrepreneur At Large or some such thing, as I do plan to stay involved.  The great staff and students have been a highlight of my past year and I am proud to remain a supporter of their work.  Although I will be 17 1/2 time zones away, I plan to occasionally occasionally call into Entrepreneur Thursday Morning Meeting.  If you are in Boulder on April 4th, check out the Meeting of The Minds, it's going to be a great event, or let me know if you would like an introduction to the great people at the Temple Grandin School.
 
My plan is to spend as much time with friends and family over the next two months while getting rid of stuff and then packing up what's left for storage.  We’re going over with two suit cases each and a big smile on our faces!  (And my mandolin of course - I'm sure I can find a bluegrass jam in Adelaide!)
 
Update March 23, 2016
 
So far I think everyone I've told about this has either said they would visit me in Australia, or they asked me to take them with me when I go.  I'm not surprised, everyone I know is fascinated by Australia and would love to visit.  The long plane ride scares most off, but it's really not that bad.  (Ask me again after I've done it twice more)
 
Some people don't grasp the size of Australia, so I found this graphic to help from the Australian Government's Geoscience webpage.
 
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It is both the "smallest continental land mass, (and) it is the world's largest island."
 
This very cool map created by someone (wish I could find their name!) at The Guardian shows the population distribution of the country.  It looks like there are a lot of people on the coasts until you look at the map key.  Most of the people do live on the coasts, but even so it is not a crowded place unless you are in one of the city centers.  Check out the article and other maps here at The Guardian.
 
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 Since so many of you have said you'd like to follow me down to Australia, here is a website I've found that has been helpful as I start to get my bearings.
 
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And here is one of Bob in Oz's maps of the Australian States, and a link to information about each one to help you decide where you want to live!
 
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March 22, 2016 in Australia, Entrepreneurship | Permalink | Comments (2)

January 25, 2015

Life after Gold Systems

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I've been done with Gold Systems for just over a year now.  The one year aniversary passed, and I thought that maybe it was time to tell the story, but really I've been looking forward much more than backwards so I'm going to save it a while longer.  I will say that when I do look back, I think mostly about the great people who worked at Gold Systems.  I've started a new company and not a day goes by where I don't think of the people I've worked with, the lessons I've learned and I'm reminded how much they helped me over the years.

Late last year I was asked to join a new venture firm as an operating partner.  The founders were people I had known for years and I have great respect for them, and I wanted to be a part of whatever they were doing.  They were the founders of a great company in Longmont, Colorado so it was natural that we would look for space for the new venture in Longmont.  One of our first meetings was with the Longmont City Manager, the Assistant City Manager and members of the Longmont Area Economic Council.  I was so impressed by how supportive everyone was and how much they were committed to making Longmont a great place for people and businesses.  As I've spent time in Longmont I've realized it is a community of wonderful people and they've quickly adopted me and become friends.

While exploring the creation of an accelerator to compliment the venture firm, I realized that there was an even greater need in Longmont.  While Boulder, Denver and Fort Collins have many places for entrepreneurs and startups to work and connect with mentors and like-minded people, Longmont didn't have a single coworking space.  There is TinkerMill, which is the largest maker space in Colorado, but there wasn't a single coworking facility.  That's just changed.

In January we opened the doors to Launch Longmont.  It's a place for entrepreneurs and startups to meet and work together, and to make the random connections that don't happen when you're working out of the spare bedroom at home.  Members can get a desk or a seat on a monthly basis with no long term commitments, and as we build out the space on the second floor they will even be able to get small suites.  Ultimately success for Launch Longmont is that these members will grow out of the space, become successful in the Longmont community and then return as mentors and speakers to help the next generation of startups.

Soon after starting Launch Longmont, I realized that I am not just helping startups, but I am in a startup myself.  I'll be sharing some of the new lessons learned, and talking about the people who have helped to make it happen over on the Launch Longmont blog, and I'll also be posting here about the journey.

If you are an experienced entrepreneur or business expert, you can help me out by visiting and getting involved as a mentor or speaker.  If you are a new entrepreneur, or you just want to get out of the garage and join a community of entrepreneurs you should also check us out.  Email me at terry@launchlongmont.com.  Thanks!

 

January 25, 2015 in Entrepreneurship | Permalink | Comments | TrackBack (0)

November 01, 2014

Getting back to the blog

In a couple of days I'm going to have a lot to talk about here on my blog and elsewhere, so I want to make sure it's still working.

To test it out, check out this video that you have to see for the technology, as well as the catchy music.  This video by OK Go shows off the Honda UNI-CUB which looks like a unicycle version of a Segway and it was filmed in one take using a specially designed quad copter.   

I Won't Let you Down.

November 1, 2014 in Music | Permalink | Comments | TrackBack (0)

June 01, 2014

Trakdot - An Internet of Things Cautionary Tale

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(Photo credit Craig)

This morning my sister sent me a link to a USA Today story "Ultimate Travel Tech Tools and Tips for Families."  She knew I would want to read about the new Trackdot, a wireless luggage tracker for frequent fliers.  Trakdot's idea is you put this little battery powered device in your luggage before you check it, and then when your luggage arrives at it's desitation, it sends you a text message saying where it is located.  That's nice when it lands the same place you do, and really helpful when it lands somewhere else so you can tell the lost luggage department where the luggage actually is.  Because you know they don't know where it is most of the time!

The Trakdot costs $49 with free shipping, and there is a $19 per year service plan to pay for its wireless usage.  You can also buy it on amazon.com.

Before I go any further, I have to say that I have not yet ordered a Trakdot.  I really could use this product, but I found most of the reviews on Amazon, sorted by "most helpful" were pretty bad.  To be fair, the most recent reviews are mostly very good.  

And this is the point of my post here. The Internet of Things market is going to be full of very cool, inexpensive and useful sounding technology, and some of it is not going to work very well especially in the early days of the products.

What I saw in the early reviews of this product were typical of many new tech products:

  1. Poorer than advertised battery life
  2. Confusing and poorly written documentation
  3. A human interface that is not obvious to use, requiring the use of the poorly written documentation
  4. Customer service that is either overwhelmed or doesn't care and leaves the early customers who believed in the vision of the product wondering if they made a mistake being an early adopter
  5. Lots of mentions in the press and in blogs by people (like me) who did not actually get to use the product before writing their breathless reviews about how great the new technology is or is not going to be
  6. Poor reviews by actual users who are frustrated and want to warn others away from the product

Whenever there is a gold rush mentality in a market, people rush in, money follows and products get shipped before they are ready because the inventors and investors are afraid that someone else is just about to ship and steal the category.  In the early days of the gold rush the press believes the PR machine and knows the public is interested in the newest thing, so the reviews tend to be uninformed and glowing.  

I am so excited by the Internet of Things - cheap little computers, connected to sensors and to the internet - and it will bring amazing new devices and services to our lives.  But I do hate to see companies get caught up in the rush to market with a product before it is quite ready.

Getting back to Trackdot, and reading the latest reviews on Amazon, I see a company that seems to be trying to get back on the right foot with their product launch.  The more recent reviews are almost all positive.  One reviewer mentioned getting an unsolicited email from the Trackdot CEO applogizing for the issues the reviewer had and then got them replacement devices.  They are getting (or generating) great stories in the press.  I love the idea of this product, and the price is right for the frequent traveler.  I hope they can overcome the early growing pains, but I know if they can't, someone else is right around the corner with a competing product.  Either way, in a little while I'm going to be able to track my luggage and most other important things in my life by cheap little devices.

I am a little cautious about the most recent reviews for Trakdot on amazon, because very few seem to be from people who have ever done a review on Amazon before or are verified purchasers of the product, and they also tend to be just a few sentences long.  I'll tell you what.  If I get 10 comments on this post, I'll buy a Trakdot and try it out, and I'll write an informed review.  Until then, consider this post as a cautionary tale about launching new products in general, and not a product review of the Trakdot product.

(Disclaimer:  I have not purchased or tested a Trakdot.  I am also an amazon.com shareholder.  Because I live in Colorado, I will not get even a few pennies if you click through and buy a Trakdot or anything else from this post.  I do my best to be independent.)

June 1, 2014 in Entrepreneurship, Internet of Things, Travel | Permalink | Comments | TrackBack (0)

May 24, 2014

Startup Week

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Boulder’s fifth Startup Week is in the history books, and I want to thank everyone involved, especially the founder Andrew Hyde and his great team of hard workers, volunteers and speakers.  This was the first time that I’ve been able to participate fully, and it was just what I needed.  In the past I’ve been too caught up in my own business to spend the week hanging out with other people who were just starting their journeys in the startup world.  I’m sure I would have benefited from the enthusiasm and great ideas being tossed around if I had made time to go in the past, and I expect I’ll spend even more time with the startup community at Boulder Startup Week next year.

During the Keynote (which was not a Keynote) David Cohen, Brad Feld and Andrew Hyde took the stage to talk about not just the startup community, but about the many communities we have right here in Boulder.  They all made it clear that while they love the Boulder community, we need to work with all of the Colorado and even world communities to collaborate to support each other, and to make the world a better place.  In fact when they asked for a show of hands, it looked like half of the people in the audience were from outside of Boulder.  That was so cool and I enjoyed my talks throughout the week with people who had just arrived, were just visiting or were thinking about moving to Boulder.
 
One simple way to participate in the vision of connecting is to just get out and visit one of those other communities.  Although Startup Week started here in Boulder, it has spread along with http://startupweekend.org all over the world.
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I was able to make it up to Fort Collins for the last day of their Startup Week of celebrating and supporting startups.  As part of the work I’m doing for 6kites I was interested in attending the panel discussion they had on Agriculture and the Internet of Things at CSU.  It was a very well done event with three different panel discussions and all taught me something and made me think big thoughts.  With 7 billion people needing to be fed every day, farmers are using technology and looking at the Internet of Things to better monitor, control and produce their crops and animals.
 
Even though Boulder Startup Week is over for another year, it is so easy to get connected to the startup community in Boulder.  I am thankful to have landed here and to be a part of a group of wonderful people who are happy to share and support entrepreneurs.

 

May 24, 2014 in Entrepreneurship, Internet of Things | Permalink | Comments | TrackBack (0)